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Posted on: May 26, 2020

Improvements at Water Treatment Plant receive state-wide recognition

Harrisonville Water Treatement Plant

The City’s largest capital projects of the past decade was recently highlighted in a feature article in a major Missouri municipal publication.

The project, a complete overhaul of the City’s Water Treatment Plant, was featured in the May/June 2020 issue of The Missouri Municiapl Review. The feature article is titled “Improving A Community’s Drinking Water Quality: Comprehensive Water Treatment Plant Upgrade Improve Water Quality for City of Harrisonville, Missouri”. 

For nearly 50 years, Lake Harrisonville has been the source of Harrisonville’s drinking water.

The original Water Treatment Plant, built and placed in service during the 1970s, was designed with conventional treatment processes that met all Missouri and federal regulations for safety and health. But the raw water quality from Lake Harrisonville has always been highly variable and at times, difficult to treat, leading to pesky taste and odor issues for some residents and businesses.

In 2013, the City asked Burns & McDonnell to conduct an evaluation to improve the water supply, treatment processes and distribution system while also developing options to reduce taste and odor issues. The project included collaboration with two members of the Board of Aldermen, who served on the City’s selection committee from project initiation through completion.

“The City also asked Burns & McDonnell to develop a plan to expand the water supply and treatment capacity to 3.0 million gallons per day (MGD). Testing confirmed that the raw water supply had high levels of methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, taste-and-odor-causing compounds released by algae.” (The Missouri Municipal Review - May/June 2020

The $8.2 million project was completed, on schedule, in September of 2018, and provides Harrisonville residents and businesses with enhanced water quality, while providing the City with additional safety features to better protect operators working at the facility.

“Most importantly, the entire scope of new treatment processes, expanded capacity and more efficient equipment have resolved the nagging water quality issues that city residents have raised for years.” (The Missouri Municipal Review - May/June 2020)

Click here to read the full article.

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